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LIFESTYLE - EDITORIAL

Jingle Dress Dance: A century-long tradition

Google celebrates the Jingle Dress Dance with today's Doodle designed by Joshua Mangeship Pawis-Steckley, an artist from Ojibwe.

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Celebrating the Jingle Dress Dance - Image Credit: Google Doodle

Celebrating the Jingle Dress Dance - Image Credit: Google Doodle

LIFESTYLE - EDITORIAL

by Caner Ozdemir

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The history of Jingle Dress Dance dates back to the 1920s. As in all traditions, this local dance event has been passed down from generation to generation. Jingle Dress Dance originates from the Ojibwe tribe living in the area between Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Ontario.

Ojibwe tribe women are still celebrating the Jingle Dress Dance at local events such as the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Grand Celebration Pow Wow. Although it was a local dance, his fame crossed borders with interesting bells and symbolizing the power of Native American women.

It is said that Jingle Dress Dance started with inspiration from a dress and dance that a father made to give hope to his daughter, who had a disease that had no hope of survival. The father, who prepares a dress for her daughter and puts small metal bells called ziibaaska'iganan in Ojibew language, says to her daughter to wear this dress and dance, and that one of her foot should always touch to the floor while dancing. The sick girl dances while wearing this dress, and she heals. Father and his daughter created the first Jingle Dress Dance Society, and the tradition started.

Over the years, the designs of the dresses and dance choreographies have changed, but the jingling sounds that have spread throughout the dance have remained the same.

When Google decided to design a Doodle to celebrate Jingle Dress Dance, they were planned to be done by an artist who grew up in that culture. Joshua Mangeshig Pawis-Steckley took on this responsibility as an artist who is playing drums with his uncle and cousins ​​at pow wow events, and whose cousins ​​and friends are Jingle Dress Dancers. And, Joshua Mangeshig Pawis-Steckley, in his Doodle, emphasized the power of indigenous women and that they are the ones to guide the future.